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ᐃᓅᓯᕋ   |   Inuusira

ᐃᓅᓯᕋ | Inuusira

ᐃᓅᓯᕋ | Inuusira: Tarralik Duffy with Pitseolak Ashoona October 21, 2021 – March 6, 2022 Reflecting on the importance of the work of Inuit artist Pitseolak Ashoona and of her 1971 illustrated autobiography titled Pictures Out of My Life, Inuusira, which means “my life”, features new work by Tarralik Duffy in dialogue with Ashoona’s prints and drawings from the gallery’s collection. Pitseolak created more than 8,000 drawings over her 20 year career, meticulously documenting details of everyday life as she experienced it as a record for future generations. Published in both English and Inuktitut syllabics, Dorothy Eber’s book featured on its cover Pitseolak’s In summer there were always very big mosquitoes, created using coloured felt-tip pen. Bringing together vivid images like this with edited interviews, the book offered exceptional access to glimpses of everyday life in creative form as well as to the thoughts and ideas of an Inuit artist – with a profound impact for both Duffy and the exhibition’s curator, Taqralik Partridge, as children. Inspired by these images of a genuine “popular” culture in the sense of “of the people”, Duffy’s work is similarly infused with references to everyday objects and materials, visually capturing the juxtaposition of traditional and contemporary cultural influences experienced by the Inuit.  ᐃᓅᓯᕋ | Inuusira is curated by Taqralik Partridge, Adjunct Curator, and organized by the Art Gallery of Guelph with the support of Canadian Heritage (Museums Assistance Program), Canada Council for the Arts, and the Ontario Arts Council. Tarralik Duffy is a multidisciplinary artist and writer who lives and works between Salliq (Coral Harbour), Nunavut, and Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Spanning jewelry and apparel to graphic works, Tarralik’s creative practice highlights distinctly Inuit experiences, referencing inherited traditions...
Collective Offerings

Collective Offerings

October 21, 2021 – March 6, 2022 Curated by Mitra Fakhrashrafi and Vince Rozario, 2021 recipients of the Middlebrook Prize for Young Canadian Curators, Collective Offerings responds to the compartmentalization and fragmentation produced by colonialism and deepened by this period of unprecedented political, ecological, and public health crises. Recognizing the particularly heavy toll exacted on racialized, migrant, disabled, and low-income communities, the curators will work with artists Meech Boakye and Christina Kingsbury, Shirin Fahimi, LAL (Rosina Kazi and Nicholas Murray), Jessica Karuhanga, and Shaista Latif, whose performance and new media practices speak to collective interdependence, mitigating the impacts of isolation for communities, networks of care, and our bodies themselves. This year’s Middlebrook Prize jurors included Nicole Caruth (independent curator and cultural strategist), Sally Frater (former Curator of Contemporary Art, Art Gallery of Guelph; current Director, Oakville Galleries), and Denise Ryner (Director/ Curator, Or Gallery, and Associate Curator, Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin). “Rozario and Fakhrashrafi’s project is an excellent example of place-based curating that considers local histories and demographics in the development of their proposal,” suggests Ryner, “They propose precise formats of engagement that extend their curatorial concepts into tangible experiences of inclusion and exclusion, which in turn supports the research and dialogical functions of their exhibition.” Organized by the Art Gallery of Guelph and presented with the support of the Centre Wellington Community Foundation Middlebrook Social Innovation Fund, the Guelph Community Foundation Musagetes Fund, and private donations.   Image: Shirin Fahimi, أم الرمل Um Al Raml, 2019, performance. Courtesy of the...
Prospetto a Mare

Prospetto a Mare

October 21, 2021 – March 6, 2022 Interrogating the interplay of mobility, colonization, and contemporary stories of migrancy, Dawit L. Petros’ exhibition Prospetto a Mare (Prospectus to Sea) examines the complicated colonial and postcolonial histories connecting East Africa and Europe. Rooted in the examination of a historic transatlantic flight, Petros shows how gaps in history and failures of public memory have affected and connected people across borders, binding the disparate geographies of Italy, Eritrea, and North America. In 1933, Italo Balbo, Benito Mussolini’s Air Force Minister, led a transatlantic flight of twenty-four seaplanes from Orbetello, Italy to the United States, arriving on July 13 which coincided with Italy’s participation in the A Century of Progress International Exposition. In Canada, Shediac Bay (New Brunswick), Shoal Harbour (Newfoundland), and Montreal (Quebec) were crucial staging and reception points for the legs of the roundtrip flight to and from the US. A feat that was celebrated as an achievement of technology and symbol of progress and modernity, the voyage would strengthen Italy’s position in Europe and support the country’s rationalization of continued colonial rule in East Africa, including Petros’ birth nation of Eritrea, a colony created by the Italians in the 19th century. The technology of the airplane, like the camera, offers a lens with which to understand how Italy constructed subjects of its empire as static, mute and invisible. Prospetto a Mare begins here, investigating through photography, video, and sound how visual representation fixed specific ideas about the nature of East Africans that continue to impact contemporary material realities of these former colonies and their global diasporas, including significant numbers of African...